Événements
Séminaires Ateliers & Conférences
Histoire économique
November 30, 2022
12:00 - 13:30
Room R2.01, Campus Jourdan
PALMA Nuno
(University of Manchester)
American treasure and the decline of Spain
Histoire économique
December 7, 2022
12:00 - 13:30
Room R2.01, Campus Jourdan
VONYO Tamas
(Université de Bocconi)
War and Socialism: Economic Backwardness in Eastern Europe.
Histoire économique
December 14, 2022
12:00 - 13:30
Room R2.01, Campus Jourdan
KOEHLER-DERRICK Gabriel
(NYU-Abu Dhabi)
Land Redistribution, Inequality, and Crisis: Evidence from Colonial Ireland
Histoire économique
January 18, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
JUIF Dacil
(Université Carlos III Madrid)
The impact of copper mining activities on education in Zambia from a long-term perspective (1920 to 2000)

With Laura Maravall-Buckwalter
Histoire économique
January 25, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
SCOTT VIALLEY Thévenin
(Sciences Po)
L'émergence d'un espace élitaire impérial et ses conséquences sur l'empire colonial français ; 1885 - 1939
Histoire économique
February 1, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
GIPOULOUX François
(CNRS)
TBA
Histoire économique
February 8, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
ARNOUX Mathieu
(EHESS/CRH)
TBA
Histoire économique
February 15, 2023
12:00 - 12:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
BEIGELMAN Marie
(Université de Barcelonne)
TBA
Histoire économique
March 8, 2023
13:30 - 16:30
Room R2.01, Campus Jourdan
COGNEAU Denis
(PSE)
Autour du livre de Denis Cogneau Un empire bon marché: Histoire et économie politique de la colonisation française, XIXe-XXe siècle (Seuil, 2023)
Summary
Autour du livre de Denis Cogneau Un empire bon marché: Histoire et économie politique de la colonisation française, XIXe-XXe siècle (Seuil, 2023)

Intervenants :

Frederik Cooper (historien New York University)

Christelle Dumas (économiste, Université de Fribourg)

Nadjil Safir (sociologue, Université d'Alger)

David Todd (historien, Sciences Po)
Histoire économique
March 15, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
SCHNEIDER Sabine
(Oxford University)
International Finance, Bilateral Cooperation and the World Silver Crisis, 1871-1879
Histoire économique
March 22, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
BECK KNUDSEN Anne Sofie
(University of Copenhagen)
Economic Growth and the Rise of Individualism: Evidence from Europe 1700-2000
Histoire économique
March 29, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
MAGGOR Noam
(IEA Paris)
Freights and Rates: Railroad Regulation as American Industrial Policy
Summary
This paper examines the controversy over railroad freight rate regulation in the late nineteenth century United States. Did state railroad commissions have the right to dictate shipping rates to the railroad industry - the biggest and most strategically important economic sector in this period - and, if yes, what would be the consequences? It shows that advocates of rate regulation, who mostly hailed from the American periphery, envisioned government control over prices as a form of developmental industrial policy. They sought to avoid American dependence on resource extraction and protect producers on the western frontier. They were remarkably successful, with important implications for the economic geography of the U.S., patterns of regional inequality, and nature of American institutions
Histoire économique
April 5, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
LOPEZ CERMENO Alexandra
(Lund University)
The Long run unexpected consequences of the arsenal of democracy
Summary
This paper aims to evaluate why some public investment programmes thrive in promoting regional economic growth while others fail. We use the largest government procurement programme in the history of the US as a natural experiment. Our database consists of 13,531 individual observations of geocoded data by industry and good of US federal investments during WWII. We split the analysis into developed industrial counties (industrial clusters, high, medium, and low tech) and less industrialized counties (agricultural) and measure the impact of the investments using differences in differences analysis combined with propensity score matching. Our main result is that Federal investments were successful depending on the previous comparative advantage of the counties that obtained the public funds. Therefore, we find no significant effect on less industrialized counties but a significant one on the manufacturing and service sectors of industrial counties. We also show that returns of the war investments depended both on their nature and location (and their interaction) according to technology type. We observe a significantly larger effect of those investments where their relative technology intensity corresponds with the comparative advantage of their location. The higher returns corresponded to high-tech investments in counties already specialized in that type of manufacturing production. These results have some important implications for the design of regional and industrial policies
April 12, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Salle R1.09, Campus Jourdan
DYKSTRA Maura
(Caltech)
Enforcement, Agency, and Accounting Cycles: The Institutional Context of the Late Imperial Chinese Business
Summary
This paper will review some of the accounting practices of Qing dynasty firms as they created particular conditions for long-distance trade. Relying mostly on a sample of litigation pertaining to debts and obligations from the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century archive of the municipality of Chongqing, it argues that the distinct but synchronous accounting cycles of Chinese firms were particularly suited to the enforcement context of Qing markets.
Histoire économique
April 19, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R2.01, Campus Jourdan
RIDOLFI Leonardo
(University of Siena)
TBA
Summary
Leonardo Ridolfi (University of Siena), Carla Salvo (Sapienza University of Rome), and Jacob Weisdorf (Sapienza University of Rome and CEPR). Abstract:
Is mechanisation labour-displacing? We use the industrial censuses from 19th-century France to examine the effect on wages and employment of one of the greatest waves of mechanisation in history: the diffusion of steam-power. We find that the rates of growth of employment and wages were considerably higher in steam-adopting industries than in non-steam-adopting ones, both in the shorter and longer run. This finding disputes the widespread belief that industrial modernisation entailed technical unemployment and falling labour-compensation. As old and new technologies often coexist even in the same production unit, our analysis also exploits the interface between the traditional (i.e. wind, water and animal) motive-powers and the new (steam-powered) ones. Our observed effect of steam-power on wages and employment varied extensively depending on how steam-technology conjoined the traditional motive-powers
May 10, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
DE LA VAISSIÈRE Etienne
(EHESS)
TBA
May 17, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
JURSA Michael
(University of Vienna)
Identifying and Quantifying Growth, and Changes of Prosperity and Inequality in a Pre-Modern Complex Agrarian Economy: the Case of Babylonia in the Age of Empires (6th Cent. BCE)
May 24, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
RASTER Tom
(Paris School of Economics)
TBA
Histoire économique
May 31, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R2.01, Campus Jourdan
ROBERTSON Charlotte
(Harvard Business School)
TBA
June 7, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
GINALSKI Stéphanie
(University of Lausanne)
«Kunstkapital » : la Société des beaux-arts de Zurich et ses réseaux financiers durant l’entre-deux-guerres.
Histoire des inégalités
June 14, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.15, Campus Jourdan
RODRIGUES Lisbeth
(University of Lisbon)
A Holy Alliance: Distributional Effects of Debt Service in Portugal, 1560-1801
Summary
This paper examines the distributional effects of public debt in Portugal from 1560 to 1800. The timeframe encompasses the transition of two distinct administrative structures from a fragmented to a centralized tax system. Whether fragmented or centralized, the tax administration established the parameters for the interaction between the monarch and bondholders in the execution of fiscal or debt contracts. The financial contract that supported this interaction placed the burden of annual interest collection on the bondholder, which was directly linked to the location of the fiscal district assigned for that payment. This paper raises the question of whether these two models yielded different distributional effects - potentially associated with the downward trend in interest rates - and whether they facilitated the coalition between the sovereign borrower and particular creditors
Histoire financière
June 21, 2023
00:12 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
MITCHENER Kris
(Leavey School of Business)
How do Financial Crises Redistribute Risk?
Summary
We examine how financial crises redistribute risk, employing novel empirical methods and micro data from the largest financial crisis of the 20th century – the Great Depression. Using balance-sheet and systemic risk measures at the bank level, we build an econometric model with incidental truncation that jointly considers bank survival, the type of bank closure (consolidations, absorption, and failures), and changes to bank risk. Despite roughly 9,000 bank closures, risk did not leave the financial system; instead, it increased. We show that risk was redistributed to banks that were healthier prior to the financial crisis. A key mechanism driving the redistribution of risk was bank acquisition. Each acquisition increases the balance-sheet and systemic risk of the acquiring bank by 25%. Our findings suggest that financial crises do not quickly purge risk from the system, and that merger policies commonly used to deal with troubled financial institutions during crises have important implications for systemic risk
July 5, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
GIORCELLI Michela
(UCLA)
“The Effects of Managerial Education on Manager’s Career Outcomes”
September 6, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
BACH Maria
(University of Lausanne)
Emancipatory National Accounting.
Summary
Separated by thousands of kilometres of land and sea, two economists produced national income estimates in the late 1860s. An Indian economist, Dadabhai Naoroji, calculated India’s first ever national income estimate for years 1867-8 and 1870-71. A North American economist, Ezra Seaman, worked out one of the first estimates for national income and domestic product for 1866 and 1869. Although on different continents, with different circumstances, both Naoroji and Seaman argued that if they could measure the size of their economies, they could understand their progress. This statement seems evident today when economic measurements like the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) are printed in widespread media and publications daily. The practise of measuring our economy, however, had only just began in the 1800s. Others argue that it started much later in the 1930s-40s when the international standards for national accounting were established. While there is growing literature exploring the links between accounting and imperial processes, there is much less on how economists from what we call the Global South today have counted their own economies. Shifting the focus to economists from the Global South, rather than colonisers, offers room for new perspectives on what national accounting did for the Global South. Studies that examine the imperial practises of counting their foreign territories have uncovered how national accounting was yet another tool to govern, control and suppress the populations of the Global South. My study shows the contrary: natives of the Global South used national accounting as an emancipatory tool. Studying instances of national accounting in the Global South can give us further insight into how and why measuring happens, and how it reflects and shapes our reality. Examining the North American case alongside the Indian case could reveal new insights. India was only starting its nationalist movement in the early 1870s. North America had been independent for almost hundred years. The comparison could then identify differences of doing national accounting in a free versus a colonised country.
September 13, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
JABKO Nicolas
(Johns Hopkins)
The waxing of technocratic neoliberalism
Histoire économique Histoire financière
September 20, 2023
12:00 - 12:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
SCHNEIDER Sabine
(LSE)
International Finance, Bilateral Cooperation and the World Silver Crisis, 1871–1892
Histoire économique
September 27, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
WARLOUZET Laurent
(Sorbonne)
Europe contre Europe. Entre liberté, solidarité et puissance
Summary
Dans son ouvrage paru récemment (Cnrs éditions, 2022), Laurent Warlouzet propose une interprétation de l'histoire des politiques économiques menées en commun par les Européens articulée autour d'une interaction entre les logiques libérales (et néolibérales), solidaires (socio-environnementale) et de puissance (politique industrielle, protectionnisme). Portant sur une longue période, de 1945 à 2022, l'ouvrage s'appuie sur des archives collectées dans huit pays européens.
Histoire économique
October 4, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
ALVAREZ-NOGAL Carlos
(Carlos-III)
Well-being and inequality in Spain during the seventeenth century: the bull of Crusade.
Summary
Spain experienced economic decline from the 1570s to 1650, recovering gradually thereafter and only reaching its early 1570s per capita income in the 1820s. How did economic decline impact on people’s perception of well-being and inequality? An unexplored source, the bulls of the Crusade can offer some answers to that question. The bull was an alms that, after 1574, was annually collected by the Spanish Monarchy in its territories giving some material and spiritual benefits to the population. An inexpensive but fixed price alms was massively bought by those aged 12 and above. The number of bulls sold relative to the relevant population provides a measure of spiritual comfort and, hence, of subjective well-being. A subjective inequality measure, the ratio of the eight reales bulls sold, intended for wealthy and high social status people, to the two reales bulls sold, intended for the common people, is also estimated. After collecting data from 1574 to 1700, the results suggest that subjective well-being deteriorated during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century improving during its last third, while subjective inequality increased from 1600-1640 to fall in the third quarter of the century.
Histoire économique
October 11, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
CASTILLO-GARCIA César
(The New School for Social Research & PSE)
How Neoliberal Hegemony was Constructed? Policy Networks and Free- Market Institutions in Peru (1930-1990)
Histoire économique
October 18, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
GOBBI Paula
(ULB)
Revolutionary Transition: Inheritance Change and Fertility Decline" joint with Victor Gay and Marc Goñi
Histoire économique
October 25, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
BARBOT Michela
(CMH)
"L’estimation des biens, un dispositif d’enforcement contractuel ? Les cas français et italien en perspective comparée (XVIIe -début XIXe siècle)"
Histoire des inégalités Histoire économique
November 8, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
SCHIFANO Sonia
(Bocconi)
The distribution of land in Luxembourg (1766–1872): Family-level wealth persistence in the midst of institutional change.
Sonia Schifano (Bocconi University) and Antoine Paccoud (LISER, LSE)
Summary
The paper analyses family-level wealth inequality and social mobility in Dudelange (Luxembourg) between 1766 and 1872. This period saw the end of feudal social relations with the integration of Luxembourg into the French revolutionary regime. The study utilizes archival data and five generations of descendants to connect the declarants of the Maria-Theresa land survey of 1766 with their descendants in the land registries of 1842 and 1872. Links between individuals are made from vertical parent-children-grandchildren relationships, however these relationships are not constant. To account for this variability, the number of ancestors available for each declarant and the generational descendant-ancestor distance that separates each declarant from his or her ancestors were considered in the social mobility analysis. The inequality analysis reveals a decline in the Gini coefficient for land ownership between 1766 and 1842, indicative of the dissolution of the feudal system. This reduction becomes less pronounced upon excluding property-less declarants from the 1766 dataset (note that in 1842 and 1872, these individuals are already excluded due to the nature of the data source). The disparity in the Gini coefficient between 1766 and 1842 lastly disappear when non-residents in Dudelange are removed from the analysis. Owing to data constraints, the social mobility analysis is also based on declarants that are residents of Dudelange and shows a high persistence of land among closer generations throughout the period. This persistence discloses that family-level transmission mechanisms limit social mobility and strongly advantage those with ancestors owning property wealth, even when there are significant changes in the organization of property relations.
Histoire des inégalités
November 15, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
NOBLE Aurelius
(LSE)
The Persistence of Aristocratic Wealth: Institutional Measures, Family Measures and Social Mobility, 1858-1907
Histoire économique
November 22, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
DUCOING Cristian
(LUND)
Assessing long run Sustainable Development: Evidence from Global Genuine Savings 1850 - 2020 (With Eoin McLaughlin and Les Oxley)
Histoire des inégalités Histoire économique
November 29, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
VIPOND Hilary
(UCL)
Technological Unemployment in Victorian Britain
December 6, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
VALENCIA CAICEDO Felipe
(Vancouver SE)
TBA
December 13, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
GAUTIER Stéphane
(PSE)
Late height growth and adult maturity from historical quasi-exhaustive panel data
Histoire économique
December 20, 2023
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
WOKER Madeline
(IEA Zurich)
The tax haven that wasn’t: imperial statecraft, capital, and the politics of corporate tax governance in the French colonial empire, 1920s-1950s
January 10, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
MONTALBO Adrien
(ESSEX)
TBA
Histoire économique
January 17, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
SGARD Jérôme
(Sciences Po)
Imperial Politics, Open Markets and Private Ordering: The Global Grain Trade (1875-1914)
Histoire économique
January 24, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
ALFANI Guido
(Bocconi University)
TBA
Histoire économique
February 7, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
CHILDRESS Stéphanie
(UT Austin)
Carbon Memories: Energy Cultures of the Green Transition
Histoire économique
February 28, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
IANDOLO Alessandro
(UCL)
Arrested Development: The Soviet Union in Ghana, Guinea, and Mali, 1955-1968.
Histoire économique
May 22, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
JUHASZ Reka
(*)
TBA
Histoire économique
May 29, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
KESSLER Amalia
(*)
L'arbitrage corporatiste et la poursuite de la démocratie industrielle aux Etats Unis (1900-1940)
Histoire économique
June 19, 2024
12:00 - 13:30
Room R1.09, Campus Jourdan
KOEHLER-DERRICK Gabriel
(*)
Colonial Service and Bureaucratic Responsiveness in the French Third Republic
Atelier Simiand
January 11, 2023
09:00 - 17:00
Room R1.15, Campus Jourdan
Atelier Simiand
Atelier Simiand n°4 
Summary
Atelier Simiand n°4 
Organized by César Castillo García and Elisa Grandi

9h00-10h20
- Maria Padovan (UParis Cité et U Rome Tor Vergata): The development of the nuclear industry in Italy and France (1960-1980)
- Antoine Nseke Misse (EHESS): The Food Stamps welfare program in the US

10h20-10h30: break

10h30-11h50 
- Zhexun (Fred) Mo (PSE): The Making of China in the 20th Century: National Wealth Accumulation from 1910 to 2020 (co-authored with Yang Li and Wang Qing) 
- Tom Raster (PSE): Breaking the Ice: The Persistent Effect of Pioneers on Trade Relationships

11h50-12h: break

12h-13h00: Clara Mattei's book presentation: The Capital Order How Economists Invented Austerity and Paved the Way to Fascism

13h00-14h:00 lunch

14h00-15h20
- Mirek Hosman (Bologna University - U PAris Cité) The supplementary finance scheme of the World Bank (1960s)
- Clara Leonard (Paris 1 & EHESS): La rivalité des troisièmes voies: Le néolibéralisme français (1938-1960)

15h20-15h30: break

15h30-17h00: round table “Connecting economic history with history of ideology and economic doctrines” with Elisa Grandi (Paris Cité), Naveen Kanalu (EHESS), Arnaud Orain (Paris 8); chaired by Clara Mattei (New School).

Drinks at the Chinchin
Atelier Simiand
March 8, 2023
09:00 - 16:00
Atelier Simiand
TBA
Histoire des inégalités Histoire économique
May 16, 2023
14:00 - 17:00
Paris School of Economics 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris, amphithéâtre
Piketty & Pomeranz : « The great divergence vs social inequalities ? »
INSCRIPTION OBLIGATOIRE : https://framaforms.org/atelier-simiand-inequality-capitalism-and-the-great-divergence-may-16-1680867240
Summary
Deux des ouvrages les plus influents de l’histoire économique de ces vingt dernières années, The Great Divergence de Kenneth Pomeranz et Le Capital au XXIe siècle de Thomas Piketty, offrent des points de vue complémentaires : le premier met l’accent sur la différenciation des zones, des régions, voire des pays au fil du temps, en termes de croissance et en dépit de structures et d’institutions initialement très similaires. Le second insiste sur les inégalités sociales au sein des pays, qui sont ensuite étudiées dans leur perspective historique et comparative.

Pour la première fois, ces deux auteurs seront réunis autour d’une table ronde ; l’objectif étant précisément de discuter de l’interaction entre leurs perspectives, tant en termes analytiques qu’en termes historiques et empiriques. La grande divergence a-t-elle modifié les inégalités sociales dans les zones concernées et dans d’autres zones ? Et inversement, comment les inégalités sociales ont-elles été influencées par la grande divergence ? Et, plus largement encore, comment étudier des interactions similaires sur une période plus longue (en particulier au 20e siècle) et dans d’autres régions (par exemple l’Afrique) ?

Le dernier livre de Piketty, Une brève histoire de l’égalité, offre une première tentative de réponse à ces questions (et à d’autres). Cette table ronde, qui s’inscrit dans le cadre des débats organisés par le Centre d’histoire économique et sociale François Simiand de Paris School of Economics et de l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), partira de cette synthèse pour discuter des intégrations et développements ultérieurs.

Organisateur : Alessandro Stanziani (EHESS, CNRS)

PROGRAMME
Présentations

Thomas Piketty (PSE, EHESS)
Kenneth Pomeranz (University of Chicago)

Table ronde

Modérateur : Eric Monnet (PSE, EHESS)
Denis Cogneau (PSE, EHESS, IRD)
Katharina Pistor (Columbia Law School)
Alessandro Stanziani (EHESS, CNRS)
Histoire des inégalités Histoire économique
September 26, 2023
09:00 - 16:00
Room R1.13, Campus Jourdan, 48 Bd Jourdan, 75014 Paris
Workshop on Trade Unions
(Workshop organized by the Economic and Social History reasearch group and the EPCI Seminar)
Workshop on Trade Unions
Summary
The Paris School of Economics has the pleasure to invite you to the workshop organized by the Economic and Social History reasearch group and the EPCI Seminar, co-organized by Jérôme Bourdieu and Paolo Santini.

Program

9:15 Welcome coffee

9:30 Morning Session
Representation of workers’ interests at multiple levels
- Michael Becher (IE University): "Economic Shocks and Changing Political Representation: Are Labor Unions the Missing Link?"
- Vladimir Pecheu (IPP): "Labor Facing Capital in the Workplace: The Role of Worker Representatives"

Direct and indirect effects of unions on wages
- Ihsaan Bassier (LSE): "Collective Bargaining and Spillovers in Local Labour markets"
- Chiara Benassi (King's College London): "Trade unions, bargaining coverage and low pay: a multilevel test of institutional effects on low-pay risk in Germany"

12:30 Lunch break

14:00 Afternoon Session
Democracy at work: an analysis of the French reform of 2008
- Sophie Béroud (ENS Lyon): "The law of the 20th of August 2008 and its implications on union practices in the firm: sociology of the practical appropriation of a new juridical tool"
- Thomas Breda (PSE): "Electoral Democracy at Work"

US unions’ organization and challenges
- Paolo Santini (Copenhagen Business School): "Do unions have egalitarian wage policies for their own employees? Evidence from the US 1959-2016"
- Miriam Venturini (University of Zurich): "The imperfect union: labor racketeering, corruption exposure, and its consequences"
Program
Atelier Simiand
December 13, 2023
09:30 - 17:00
Room R2.02, Campus Jourdan, 48 Bd Jourdan, 75014 Paris
Atelier Simiand
Les empires français dans leurs dimensions économiques (18 e -20 e siècle)
Summary
Organisation : Denis Cogneau et Arnaud Orain

9h30. Introduction

9h45 – 12h00 : Session 1
- Hugo Carlier (Doctorant, SciencePo), « Conquest by Money? Tirailleurs Sénégalais and
Currencies in West Africa »
- Pablo Alvarez Aragon (Doctorant, Université de Namur) : « Colonial Education and its
Intergenerational Transmission: Evidence from Colonial and Post-Independence Congo »
(with Catherine Guirkinger and Paola Villar)
- Fred Zhexun Mo (Doctorant, PSE) : « Soldiers versus Laborers: Legacies of Colonial
Military Forced Labor in Mali » (with Ismaël Yacoubou Djima and Marion Richard)

12h00-13h15 : Déjeuner

13h15-14h45 : Session 2
- Mihai Olteanu (Doctorant, Johns Hopkins University) : « La richesse des nations et
l’abolition de la servitude : un concours académique à la fin de la Révolution française »
- Jessica Balguy (Docteure, EHESS), « Le prix de la liberté : abolir l’esclavage et
indemniser les propriétaires de l’empire colonial français en 1848 »

14h45-15h15 : Pause

15h15-16h45 : Session 3
- Fanny Malègue (Doctorante, Ined/Ehess) « Recensements coloniaux et pratiques
statistiques de production dans les plantations (Caraïbes françaises, XVIII e siècle) : des
chiffres concurrents ? »
- Noémie Marie-Rose (Doctorante, Ehess) « Travailler après l’abolition de l’esclavage : 
l’organisation du travail ‘libre’ en Martinique de 1848 à 1855 ».